Of Cherry Blossoms and Business Cards

Japan

In my practice, I work with people from all around the world, but a large number of them come out of Europe, more specifically, Germany. While that has made me very sensitive to the cultural quirks of different European cultures, I’m not nearly as familiar with the dos and don’ts of Asian culture. That’s why, when I was asked to meet with a prospective Japanese client, I reached out to a friend and colleague for advice. His tips are below, for your reading pleasure.

  • Don’t be uncomfortable with silence. Japanese often pause for long periods, or sit in silence. It is crazy uncomfortable for a westerner.
  • Small grunts (mmm, mmmm) are not signs of agreement, but just I’m listening. The reverse is also true and can help with number 1.
  • Japanese occasionally close their eyes in meeting and look like they are going to sleep (and in large meetings many do sleep). It is not considered rude at all.
  • You probably read this but don’t put the business card away. When they hand it to you study it, and when you sit, put it in front of you. If more than one person comes, you line them up in front of you in the order the people sat (don’t make a stack).
  • Unless this is a very western Japanese person, he or she will want to establish a relationship with you before bringing you on board. They may say they’re hiring you, but you might see just little dribbles of work until you get a good relationship. Wine and dine and spend time with them, visit them, give them attention. The more comfortable they are with you the more biz you’ll get.

I found these pretty helpful, and some probably apply in most cultures to differing degrees.

For those of you in the Philadelphia area with an interest in things Japanese, the Cherry Blossom Festival (above, unfortunately this blog post is too late for that) is a great event. See the Japan America Society of Greater Philadealphia for more events.